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GOT QUESTIONS?
WE'VE GOT
THE ANSWERS

 

Closed captioning is meant for a non-hearing audience and so includes non-verbal information in addition to what speakers say. This can include sounds effects, speaker IDs, and positioning (left, right, centre) to indicate who is speaking. Subtitling assumes that the audience can hear but doesn’t understand the language, so it deals with what the speakers say but doesn’t include the non-verbal information.
We know a shooting script might not reflect the final product very accurately, but it gives us a place to start. When we’re working from the original script, we know how that character’s last name is spelled, or what names to use for that species of life on that far-away planet. It also helps us to identify off-screen characters.
Yup. We’ll do whatever you want. “Centre” or “Center”… you decide.
We can work in both French and English, and use experienced staff with flawless spelling and grammar. Grâce à notre personnel spécialisé, nous produisons le sous-titrage en anglais ou en français dans une grammaire et une orthographe impeccables.
We can subtitle with any true-type font you can provide. If you have specific questions about this, just drop us a line.
No. Only the owner of the intellectual property rights, or the copyright owner, can legally hire someone to caption a show.
We’re not too modest to say it: we can work with pretty much anything you send us. But there are a few ways you can help the process along and sending us the right file formats is a great place to start. To caption your media, Line 21 needs a digital file of your media as it will be aired in one of the following file formats: QuickTime file, Sorenson 3 Compressor, 320 X 240, H.264, 640 x 480 If you plan to send pre-final media, it is crucial that we know what will be changing and where. We hate to charge you for doing unnecessary work. As well we need an electronic copy of any script you have in any of the following formats: .rtf .doc .pdf .wps .txt .asc .fdr. If you have a script in another format, please contact the office and we’ll see what we can do for you. If no script is available, please send a list of character IDs.
Closed-captioning requirements are attached to a broadcaster’s licence. Generally, large broadcasters (CBC, CTV, Global, etc.) are required to closed caption 90% of overall programming and 100% of local news. Additionally, specialty channels and pay-per-view channels are obliged to provide closed captioning for at least 90% of their programming. Visit the Canadian Radio and Television Commission (CRTC) site for full details. *Line 21 is not responsible for the content of external websites.
It's always best if we work with final media with your titles/supers in so the captioning won't obscure the titles. If that's not an option, let us know where they are and we'll move the captions so they don't obscure your titles.

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